.

WHAT’S IN
OUR GARDEN!

March 1. 2017  Spring is in the air–it will likely get cold again, perhaps even snow, but some trees can’t wait!

 

__________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

August 28, 2016–Hot and hotter!  Finally, the dog days of August are about over.  We have been busy in the garden…annuals are about gone, hopefully most are still alive and well in your gardens…so the spring space dedicated to annuals is now a late summer space dedicated to the ‘display garden.’  We have created a walk-through garden planted with a wonderful assortment of unusual trees and shrubs planted in pairs–each half of the garden a mirror image of the other half.

We are always hearing about and reading about garden centers with the greatest selection of plant materials–not having visited all those centers, we can’t agree or disagree.  What we can say however, is that Ambleside has for over fifty years offered, and still does offer among the widest selections of plant materials in New Jersey.  How is this for an exercise: Take this  list to your local garden center and ask to be shown the following plant materials.

Dwarf Barberry ‘Admiration’—Dwarf Cedar ‘Red Star—Dwarf Boxwood ‘Tide Hill’—Weeping Katsura Tree—Abelia ‘Sunshine Daydream’—Dwarf Japanese Maple ‘Tattoo’—Top-grafted Tree Form Korean Lilac—Coral Bark Japanese Maple—Dwarf Cryptomeria ‘Tansu’—Top-grafted Dwarf Hinoki Cypress—Dwarf Japanese Red Pine ‘Low Glow’—Top-grafted Dwarf Hinoki Cypress ‘Verdoni’—Callicarpa ‘Early Amethyst’—Blue Spruce ‘Iseli Fastigiate’—Dwarf Japanese Maple ‘Ryusen’—Nandina ‘Firepower’—‘Dragon Lady’ Holly—Top-grafted Dwarf Ginkgo ‘Mariken’—Japanese Maple ‘Twombley Red Sentinel’—Fastigiate Norway Spruce ‘Cupressina’—Microbiota decussata ‘Russian Juniper’—Variegated Azalea ‘Silver Sword’—Dwarf Andromeda ‘Cavatine’—Dwarf Japanese White Pine ‘Pent Azuma’—Weeping Dawn Redwood ‘Miss Grace’—Picea Omorika Nana ‘Dwarf Oriental Spruce’—Dwarf Nandina ‘Burgundy Wine’—Dwarf Japanese White Pine ‘Tanima No Uki’—Top-grafted Blue Star Juniper—Tree Form Winterberry Holly ‘Sparkleberry’—Top-grafted Dwarf White Pine ‘Vercurve’—Dwarf Bald Cypress ‘Seacrest’

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After that visit, come see us, walk the garden, and we will show you all the rest of the plants on the list!!  We hope to see you soon!   Signed,

PAIRS OF PLANTS PERFECTLY PLACED/PLACED PERFECTLY PLANT PAIRS!

__________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

__SUMMER 2016–FROG TALK__

________________________

Lollipop Azalea

Lollipop Azalea

 

 

 

 

June 30, 2016  “What,  all of your azaleas have finished blooming??”  We are still going strong here with more in the wings just waiting to pop into bloom!  The Lollipops have just finished, the Lemon Drops are going strong, the Milleniums are just starting, and the Pennsylvanias have yet to break bud.  That’s a lot of color for early summer!  These are all hybrid crosses of the native Azaleas that grow in open woods throughout the east coast from Georgia to New England, and bloom from early spring well into summer depending on the variety. Remember Henry Thoreau, hanging out up there by Walden Pond in Massachusetts during the early days–he spent winters in

Azalea Lemon Drop Rhododendron viscosum 'Lemon Drop'

Azalea Lemon Drop

                                                                                             

his cabin waiting for the wild   Azaleas to bloom with their unforgettable fragrance. Those azaleas that he was waiting on were     probably either Pinxterbloom or Sweet Azaleas (Rhododendron periclymenoides or Rhododendron arborescens).  Other wild azaleas native from New Jersey south include Swamp Azalea (Rhododendron viscosum) and Coast Azalea (Rhododendron atlanticum).  Piedmont Azalea (Rhododendron canescens) and Plumleaf Azalea (Rhododendron prunifolium) are native to the southern Appalachians, but are perfectly hardy up here.  Any garden with all these plants and their subsequent hybrid crosses would be filled with color nonstop from April into early August!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Millenium Azalea

 

 

Blooming white, pink, yellow, and red-orange, many of these hybrids are fragrant–with some being deliciously so!!  All are hardy in our area, and are wonderful companion plants to evergreen azaleas, rhododendrons, and laurels.  Some tolerate moist soils, some tolerate dryer soils–all are happy with evenly moist soils with some high canopy trees to provide for a bit of afternoon shade.  Check them out, discover the fragrance that Thoreau knew and extend the blooms in your garden!

 

 

 Azalea Pennsylvania (Rhododendron viscosum x prunifolium)

Azalea Pennsylvania

_________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________

JUNE 6, 2016  My father died a month ago.  His memory had been failing for a long time; he’d been diagnosed with dementia.  He started Ambleside together with my mother back in 1965.  I was in the seventh grade and remember taking the bus down after school to help out.  So now I take time to wander throughout the garden center and stop to look at different plants–he had many favorites, and they all told stories…

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

EUROPEAN GINGER AND A JAPANESE UMBRELLA PINE

…Paperbark Maple, Enkianthus, Blueberry Bushes…He often mused about his horticultural gene that prompted him to open a garden center and take a ‘road less traveled’ with all of its potholes.  We fell in some, we dodged others. We landscaped a town; we exhibited 8 times in the New Jersy Flower Show during the 80s and 90s and received 8 Governor’s Trophies or Highest Point Scores..Dawn Redwood, Winterberry Holly, Fothergilla…Ambleside became known as one of the most interesting and unique garden centers in New Jersey with an extensive selection of rare and unusual plant materials…American Yellowwood, Cornus Mas, Stewartia…I am still amazed that he was always able to keep up his enthusiam.  And I am grateful that he managed to pass on that horticultural gene to me.  When he finally started to slow down, he told me not to put him out to pasture in left field–I told him that I wouldn’t; how about if I pitched, he played third and we would move the base back a little each year…Zelkova, Ostrich Ferns, Japanese Tree Lilac…

tstruck1965

He spent some time in left field, and then he ended up here on the porch with his pipe and the New York Times and a whimsical greeting to whoever came in.  Women could always count on an appraising look and then the compliment ‘you are like a breath of fresh air!’   He would ask men what their project was, and whether or not a Fringetree might fit. Sometimes he would work his way toward politics, sometimes he’d ask if they had seen a certain Times article, sometimes he’d ask if they knew what loquacious meant …European Ginger, Japanese Umbrella Pine, Viburnum Carlesi…

 

________________________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

VIBURNUM CARLESI–KOREAN SPICEBUSH

APRIL 23, 2016–SURE LOOKS LIKE SPRING HAS TAKEN IT’S OWN SWEET TIME IN ARRIVING–FINALLY, I CAN SEE LEAVES COMING OUT ON ALL OF THE TREES IN THE WOODS–THEY ALL STARTED TO LEAF OUT WITH THAT MARCH WARM SPELL, AND THEN STOPPED WITH THE EARLY APRIL COLD SNAP–CERTAIN THAT SOME LEAF BUDS WERE FROZEN SO SOME TREES HAD TO START ALL OVER AGAIN MAKING LEAF BUDS–ROUGH LIFE FOR ALL!!

 ANYWAY IN SPITE OF THE FICKLE WEATHER, CARLESI VIBURNUMS KEEP ON SCHEDULE.  INVARIABLY, EVERY SPRING, SOMEONE WALKS DOWN OUR STREET CHASING THEIR NOSE-SEARCHING FOR THE ORIGIN OF THE WONDERFUL SPICY, SWEET FRAGRANCE OF THE VIBURNUM CARLESI.  MY FATHER OFTEN REFERRED TO THIS PLANT, ALSO CALLED KOREANSPICE BUSH, AS HIS CHANEL #5 BUSH AND SUGGESTED IT BE PLANTED NEXT TO OPEN BEDROOM WINDOWS!!!  SO CHASE YOUR NOSE, ENJOY THIS, AND DON’T GIVE HER PERFUME, GIVE HER A VIBURNUM.

________________________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

APRIL 8 2016.  WELL, WE GOT PAST THE FIRST COLD SNAP–SOME MAGNOLIAS WERE FROSTED; SOME PAID ATTENTION AND KEPT TIGHT BUDS SO THEY STILL HAVE FLOWERS COMING. NOW THERE IS ANOTHER LAST GASP OF WINTER ON THE WAY SO WE WILL SEE IF THEY STILL PAY ATTENTION!   PAST WEEK WAS BUSY, BUSY, AND BUSY!!!–ONE SHIPMENT AFTER ANOTHER–LOTS OF COOL THINGS FROM THE WEST COAST–I ALWAYS FORGET HOW MANY GREAT THINGS ARE SOON TO ARRIVE.  MANY FABULOUS MAPLES ALL IN FULL LEAF–HAVE TO PROTECT MOST INSIDE OR UNDER PLASTIC UNTIL AFTER THE COLD SPELL……AND FOR THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN WONDERING, THE BEST DELIVERY OF ALL WAS MY FIRST GRANDCHILD–A DAUGHTER, PHOEBE JEAN, BORN TO MY SON AND HIS WIFE.  AND HOW ABOUT THIS–BORN ON APRIL 2, SHE HAS THE SAME BIRTHDATE AS MY DAUGHTER!!  TOO COOL.

______________________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

APRIL 2, 2016.  Too bad that so many of the saucer magnolias got zapped with the cold weather last week!  Looks like cold weather is coming again this week.  Many magnolias bloom later than the pink saucer ones.  I just went out to tell our magnolias here to keep their buds tight a little while longer so they don’t get frosted.  Hopefully we will get to see them bloom for longer than 24 hours!  We’re expecting lots of color–pink, maroon, white, and of course yellow.

______________________________________________________________________________

EricaSpringwoodWhiteforwebEricaSpringwoodPinkforweb

MARCH 25, 2016.  Winter Heath often blooms beneath the snow beginning in mid to late February and continues into April.  Shown here with either pink or white flowers, all heaths require protection from cold winds, and very well drained soils.

_________________________________________________________________

MARCH 11, 2016     SO WHAT IS BLOOMING FIRST THIS YEAR ??!!  WITCH HAZELS ARE STILL GOING STRONG, ALTHOUGH WITHOUT ALL OF THE SNOW.  CROCUSES ARE POPPING UP ALL OVER ALONG WITH THE OCCASIONAL DAFFODIL; AND NEXT, IT LOOKS LIKE A TIE BETWEEN THE YELLOW FLOWERING CORNUS MAS AND THE SHOWY PINK OKAME CHERRY.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

         

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLOWERS OF CORNELIAN CHERRY (CORNUS MAS) AND OKAME CHERRY  (PRUNUS X OKAME)

________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Yellow Trillium

JUNE   Finally the spring rush is slowing and I see time to relax up ahead on the horizon!  I did manage to find the time to visit all the wildflowers–a big colony of Yellow Trillium that never fails to bloom and the fickle Bloodroots, Virginia Bluebells and Dutchman’s Breeches that bloom and then embark on mini road trips throughout the yard to relocate, set themselves up and establish new clumps for next year.  Late spring and early summer bring in the ornamental flowering trees that too often get overlooked–Not a lot in the way of pink flowering trees, but I suspect that someone is quietly working on new varieties.

_______________________________________________

Chinese Fringetree

Chinese Fringetree

Fringetrees have ususual flowers resembling clumps of confetti hanging down–thus the sometimes-used- name ‘old man’s beard’.  Fringetrees grow happily in both sunny and partially shaded conditions, and are usually available in both single stem treeform or multiple stem clump form.  There is an American Fringetree (Chionanthus Virginicus) and a Chinese Fringetree (Chionanthus retusas) with each variety having its fans–

American Fringetree

American Fringetree

my father long championed the American Fringetree with its much larger and more fragrant flower clusters.  Needing to counter him, I have always favored the Chinese variety with its much more irregular and sculptured branching structure.  Both varieties bloom in mid May into June.

________________________________________________

Styrax Japonica and Styrax Obassia are wonderful unusual trees not often seen in the landscape–Japanese Snowbell (Styrax Japonica) is a small, twiggy, well behaved tree covered with small white bell like flowers; and the related Fragrant Snowbell (Styrax Obassia) grows much larger, has large leaves, beautiful branching structures and clusters of lightly fragrant  flowers drooping down.  There is a pink variety of Styrax Japonica (Styrax Japonica ‘Pink Chimes’) and also a weeping white variety (Styrax Japonica ‘Carillon’).  Pink Chimes shows a pale pink that seems to fade somewhat with hot weather.  All of the Snowbells flower from late May into early June.

______________________________________________________________

After the Styrax finish, it’s time for the Japanese Tree Lilac.  Blooming throughout June, this hardy tree will grow to about 25′ tall with an almost equal width.  Covered with large clusters of white flowers, the Tree Lilac (Syringa Reticulata) is extremely showy in bloom with a fragrance not be be forgotten!  The Tree Lilac makes for a great small ornamental tree off a patio or low deck.  ‘Ivory Silk’ is the most popular variety of Tree Lilac, being a more compact grower and a reliable bloomer

_______________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 CORNUS MAS BLOSSOMS IN EARLY SPRING

 APRIL  My father always told me that the month of April was the hardest in the garden center business–everything is all happening at once and there were always too many things to get finished in preparing for the upcoming year.  And my brother always told me to slow down because there was too much happening in the spring and that if you didn’t find time enough to watch some plant emerging from the winter you might just miss it and have to wait until the following year!  My Bloodroot and Dutchman’s Breeches come to mind and I have to make a note to remember to visit them each year.  Fortunately, the Cornus Mas that shades some of my wildflowers blooms for a long time and I never miss it.  Bunches of tiny yellow flowers cluster in round balls and seem to last throughout the month.  If the bees wake up and pollinate flowers, cranberry shaped fruit appear in late summer–suitable for preserves (we received some from a wonderful Russian lady who worked here years back–though she forgot to remove the pits!)  Cornus Mas, also called Cornelian Cherry is native to Eastern Europe and is perfectly hardy throughout New Jersey.  This small ornamental tree will grow to about 20 feet in height and about 10 feet wide.  It is available in clump form and sometimes as a single stem tree.   More mature trees will show attractive exfoliating bark, making this a good choice ornamantal  for multiple seasons–Another nice harbinger of spring on the way, Cornus Mas blooms after the Witch Hazels and starts before the forsythia.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

____________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

MARCH SOMETIMES WINTER JUST HAS A HARD TIME LETTING GO, AND SOMETIMES SPRING JUST HAS A HARD TIME GETTING GOING–BUT THE WITCH HAZELS ALWAYS BLOOM–SOMETIMES IN THE WINTER AND SOMETIMES IN THE SPRING!!  

Witch Hazels are gaining in popularity with many more varieties being named in recent years.  Most hybrid varieties–crosses between Hamamelis mollis and Hamamelis japonica (Chinese and Japanese Witch Hazels),  bloom from January through March depending on the individual cultivar.  Flowers can remain on plants for nearly a month with many being lightly fragrant.  Pictured below are some Witch Hazels in flower following a late winter snowfall.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

PRIMAVERA WITCH HAZEL

_______________________________________________________________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

DIANE WITCH HAZEL

______________________________________

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

JALENA WITCH HAZEL

_______________________________________________________________________________

Arnold's Promise Witch Hazel

Arnold’s Promise Witch Hazel in early spring

Diane Witch Hazel

Diane Witch Hazel blooming in early spring

 Witch Hazels prefer well drained soils, and perform equally well in light shade or full sun.  During the fall months, Witch Hazels provide spectacular combinations of yellow, orange, and red foliage.

________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________

GARDENS ARE TO LIVE IN
AND
BEAUTIFUL GARDENS START AT AMBLESIDE